29 Predictions from History That Came True

Many individuals have made predictions throughout history, with some so accurate they leave us in awe. Whether through intuition, vision, or sheer genius, these forecasts have shaped and mirrored the course of events, making us wonder about fate, destiny, and human perception. Here are some astonishing predictions from history that remarkably came true.

The Titanic’s Doom

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Fourteen years before the RMS Titanic sank, Morgan Robertson wrote a novel titled „Futility.“ It detailed the tragic sinking of a ship named „Titan,“ which, like the Titanic, was deemed unsinkable and sank after hitting an iceberg.

Jules Verne’s Moon Landing

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In his 1865 novel „From the Earth to the Moon,“ Verne wrote about a space capsule launched from Florida that landed in the Pacific Ocean after orbiting the moon. Over a century later, Apollo 11 mirrored this journey.

Nostradamus and The Great Fire of London

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

The famed 16th-century seer predicted, „The blood of the just will be demanded of London, burnt by fire in the year 66.“ In 1666, The Great Fire of London occurred.

Mark Twain’s Own Demise

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Twain was born in 1835 when Halley’s Comet was visible. He predicted he’d exit the world with it as well. In 1910, the year of the comet’s return, Twain passed away.

H.G. Wells Predicts Atomic Bombs

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In his 1914 book „The World Set Free,“ Wells imagined cities destroyed by „atomic bombs.“ Three decades later, this became a grim reality.

E.M. Forster’s Internet Prediction

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In his 1909 novella „The Machine Stops,“ Forster envisioned a world where people communicate through a global network, eerily similar to today’s internet.

John Watkins and Modern Technology

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In 1900, John Watkins Jr. predicted technologies for the 21st century, including mobile phones, color photographs, and pre-cooked meals.

Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Huxley’s 1931 novel predicted a future of genetic engineering, IVF, and a medicine-induced, carefree existence reminiscent of today’s antidepressants.

Orwell’s Vision of 1984

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Though not exact, George Orwell’s depiction of a surveillance state in „1984“ has been compared to modern government monitoring.

Tesla’s Smartphone Prediction

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Nikola Tesla, in 1926, predicted devices that would allow „instantaneous communication“ globally, much like our smartphones.

Spengler Predicts WWII

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In 1918, Oswald Spengler forecasted a second major conflict around 1939. World War II began in 1939.

Baba Vanga’s Predictions

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

The blind Bulgarian seer predicted the 44th US president would be African-American and that he’d be „the last one.“ Barack Obama was the 44th president.

Ray Bradbury’s Earbuds

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In „Fahrenheit 451,“ Bradbury described „seashell radios“ akin to today’s earbuds.

Michel de Nostredame’s Predictions

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In one of his quatrains, Nostradamus is believed to have predicted Hitler’s rise and the subsequent events of World War II.

Edwin Armstrong’s FM Radio

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Despite criticisms in the 1920s, Armstrong knew Frequency Modulation (FM) would be the future of radio.

The Wreck of the Titan

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

The fictitious „Titan“ shared similarities with the Titanic and sank in April, just like the real ship.

Tolstoy’s Russian Revolution

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In his writings, Tolstoy expressed beliefs that foreshadowed the Bolshevik Revolution and the rise of the Communist regime.

Philip K. Dick’s Crime Predictions

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Dick’s „Minority Report“ described a future where crimes are predicted and stopped before they occur, a notion now explored with predictive policing.

Roger Bacon’s Microscope and Telescope

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In the 13th century, Bacon predicted devices that could enhance our sight, leading to the eventual invention of microscopes and telescopes.

Lady Montagu’s Smallpox Vaccination

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In the 18th century, Lady Montagu wrote about a method she observed in Turkey that could prevent smallpox. This was a precursor to vaccination.

Da Vinci’s Flying Machines

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Leonardo da Vinci sketched machines in the 15th century that resemble modern helicopters and airplanes.

Isaac Asimov’s Robot Advancements

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Asimov’s 1950 essay predicted robots would be a common household sight by 2000, reflecting today’s advancements in robotics.

Abraham Lincoln’s Dream

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Lincoln reportedly told a friend about a dream where he saw his own assassination. Weeks later, he was killed.

Dickson’s Motion Pictures

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Louis Le Prince mysteriously vanished in 1890 after developing an invention that captured moving images, foreshadowing the emergence of cinema, a significant form of entertainment today.

Stanisław Lem’s Ebooks

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In 1961, Lem’s „Return from the Stars“ discussed electronic books, decades before Kindles and e-readers.

Tom Clancy’s 9/11 Prediction

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In his 1994 novel, Clancy had a terrorist crashing a plane into the US Capitol, eerily reminiscent of the 9/11 attacks.

Bradbury’s Wall-sized TVs

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In „Fahrenheit 451“, Bradbury imagined families watching wall-sized televisions, a concept realized with today’s home theaters.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Body Armor

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Doyle once suggested a garment that could stop bullets. Today, we have bulletproof vests.

John Elfreth Watkins Jr. and Digital Photography

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

In 1900, Watkins predicted portable cameras, foreseeing the evolution of digital photography.

en_USEnglish
Scroll to Top